Family Business branding

27th May 2015
Paul Bailey

Campden Family Business provides business-owning families of substantial wealth with the knowledge, insights and vital business intelligence they require to manage their enterprises and their families successfully. When they looked at how the world of branding is changing, they asked us for our thoughts.

‘Many family businesses intuitively believe that family can add to their brand, but are they correct? Jessica Tasman-Jones looks at how the world of branding is changing, and why slapping family in your tagline and thinking that’ll do is no longer enough’

This is the introduction to a feature piece in Campden Family Business magazine which considers how branding has changed, and how this might affect family business. We were asked to share our expertise in branding, and some of our comments from the feature are below.

You can read the full article here (pg 52-58).

More on Campden FB here

‘The world of branding is changing and it seems family businesses are among those not keeping up. Paul Bailey, founding partner and creative director of branding and design agency 1977 Design, explains consumers didn’t used to have a voice. “If someone had a bad experience of a brand previously, they might have moaned to their friends next door. Nowadays, they can tell the world about it.” Companies need to treat branding like a window into how they do business, says Bailey, not, as it is sometimes wrongly perceived, as a veneer to hide behind. “A brand people trust is so much more powerful in the longer term.”’ (pg 54)

‘Family businesses have an authenticity advantage, argues Bailey. “Authenticity means there is essentially a purpose to the business rather than just making a profit. The idea that a family has been involved with a business for years and years and years gives people a sense of honesty.” In the new age of branding, Bailey explains, people want a long-term relationship with brands.’ (pg 56)

‘Thorough research underpins the rebranding process, which can be driven by a once relevant brand that now feels outdated, but also mergers and acquisitions. At 1977 Design, Bailey explains, the agency sits down with staff from all levels of the business, as well as external stakeholders and customers. “Basically you find out what is this brand, what is it all about, what is your product offering, what is your brand offering, what are the benefi ts to people of using you and the business. And we then talk to people about what their market is, who’s their audience, what’s the competition at the moment.”’ (pg 57)

"Companies need to treat branding like a window into how they do business, says Bailey, not, as it is sometimes wrongly perceived, as a veneer to hide behind. “A brand people trust is so much more powerful in the longer term.”

“Authenticity means there is essentially a purpose to the business rather than just making a profit."